9/21, license to party

For the last five years Spain has suffered the devastating effects of an inflexible labor market, an economy based on overbuilding residential property, banks with questionable lending practices and politicians who thought they were above the law. When most people read the papers, they go directly to the sports pages to get a jolt of positive energy from reading about the success of Spain’s tennis players, football teams and motorcycle racers.

That’s the way it is for 51 weeks of the year, except during festival week, which in Rioja is the wine harvest festival in honor of St. Matthew (San Mateo in Spanish) from September 20 to 25, when all hell breaks loose and the region’s 300,000 inhabitants plus probably 100,000 others from neighboring regions and abroad devote themselves to a frenzy of partying. We deserve it.

The festival starts at 1pm on September 20 when the mayor lights a rocket from the balcony of the city hall in Logroño. This event is called the chupinazo. This year the mayor asked everyone present to forget about their problems and have fun.  Obviously, we were all paying attention because her instructions were followed to the letter.

The crowd waiting for the rocket, with the king and queen of the festival in the foreground.

The crowd waiting for the rocket, with the king and queen of the festival in the foreground. (Photo credit:  larioja.com).

In the past, the city hall square was filled with young people carrying bags of flour and plastic bottles filled with cheap red wine. On hearing the rocket explode, they would douse everyone in sight with wine and then throw flour around, making a god-awful mess of other partygoers who then walked to the old part of town to sing, dance, eat and drink in one of the 100 plus bars in the area.

In recent years, the city fathers have tried to enforce a ‘clean chupinazo’ by stationing police officers around the entrance to the square to keep partygoers from throwing flour around.  Fat chance.  As soon as everyone leaves the square, out comes the flour.

After the rocket goes off. (Photo credit: riojatrek.com)

After the rocket goes off.
(Photo credit: riojatrek.com)

The atmosphere in the old part of town is electric – big swaying crowds of people eating, drinking, dancing and singing, people meeting friends or running into friends unseen for years, going to bullfights, jai alai matches, eating lunch and dinner in bars or restaurants, staying out until 3 or 4 in the morning every day, catching a catnap and a snack and starting all over again.  Believe me, after five or six days of non-stop partying, one is actually glad it’s over.  Until next year, that is!

Calle Laurel, the epicenter of old Logroño. (Photo credit:  blogs.larioja.com)

Calle Laurel, the epicenter of old Logroño.
(Photo credit: blogs.larioja.com)

I consider myself extremely lucky (or extremely resilient) because I go to two of these festivals every year – San Fermín in Pamplona in July and San Mateo in Logroño in September. I have no intention of quitting.

Today is the last day of the wine festival and tomorrow, Logroño will go back to normal, with lots of bad news to fill the newspapers.  Right now, I’m trying to persuade my wife to go out tonight.  If I can get her off the sofa, I might have a chance!

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